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Learning from Failure 2 – recognising your limitations 

I wrote the other day about learning from failure, and I thought I would develop the theme a little further.  One of the keys of a successful leader / business person, is to learn their own limitations and to ensure that they compensate for them by building a balanced and team and by co-operating with others. […][...] read more » Learning from Failure 2 – recognising your limitations 

Walking in the footsteps of others

  I recently spent an amazing week in the Lake District.  I wanted to explore some of the higher hills that I hadn’t visited before.  Technically they qualify as mountains, (and certainly felt that way!) but that term feels odd to apply to our English landscape.  I walk regularly, and certainly take sensible precautions, but […][...] read more » Walking in the footsteps of others

How to get your team to share and collaborate better

Google tried an interesting experiment to see if it could get its teams working better together.  It was called Project Aristotle and it studied their team dynamics.  They found that in the most collaborative teams, no one person spoke for more than 80% of the time.  This enabled others to ask clarifying questions and voice […][...] read more » How to get your team to share and collaborate better

Feedback – the gentler path

I have long been a believer in the value of feedback.  However, I can’t help wincing internally when I remember the company I worked for that introduced feedback as a standard approach / tool.  Someone would approach you, full of self righteousness, with the phrase “Can I give you some feedback..?”  What followed was usually […][...] read more » Feedback – the gentler path

Little by little

It is usually said that leaders need to focus on big picture stuff, but this forgets that even grand plans have to be implemented one step at a time, one day at a time.  It is the same with personal change, you only lose weight ounce by ounce, you can’t jump to pounds or stones.  […][...] read more » Little by little

Transformative thinking – 4

Everybody thinks they are unique and alone Clearly in one sense this must be true, but we have only our own view of the world and we are the sole inhabitant of our little cerebral desert island.  We therefore tend at times to feel our problems are similarly unique and compellingly important and of course, […][...] read more » Transformative thinking – 4

Transformative thinking –3

Your happiness depends on your thoughts! We don’t necessarily have the power to change our circumstances (at least not in the short term) but we always have a choice about how we feel about them.  As something of perfectionist, I have a little voice that tells me “Things should be like this..” and if they […][...] read more » Transformative thinking –3

Transformative thinking – 2

Things change.. whether we like it or not! We value constancy and and loyalty but how we feel changes over time, people around us change, circumstances change too.  All this means we dwell in a state of constant flux, the fact that things might seem the same is, in truth, an illusion.  Wisdom comes from […][...] read more » Transformative thinking – 2

Transformative thinking – 1

Everything that happens is a chance to grow and change It is an oft quoted truism to say “Insanity to keep doing the same thing and expecting different results”, and yet most of us do this, both in business and in our personal lives.  We excuse it as “being different this time..” or “standard operating […][...] read more » Transformative thinking – 1

Silence is NOT neutral

If you find that your meetings are not giving you the discussion that you need, if people stay quiet and then disassociate themselves from supposed agreements afterwards, here is a handy little tip you can employ.  Change the rules of your meeting and state that silence will be assumed to mean that you endorse the […][...] read more » Silence is NOT neutral